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CZÉH, Boldizsár

CZÉH, Boldizsár

PhD

Telefon: 29303, 61252

Supervisor of the following TDK topics

Supervisor: CZÉH, Boldizsár

Co-supervisor: Prof. Dr. MISETA, Attila

Neuropsychiatric disorders are common and often chronic illnesses imposing severe social and economic burden on our civilized societies. A further complicating issue is that often there are no valid biomarkers that could help us to make the proper diagnosis and to monitor the progression of the disease and the therapeutic response. However, it is important to search for novel, potential biomarkers and this is a field of intense clinical research. The applicant would join to a team of researches doing such clinical research and by that would also get familiar with the current diagnostic tools.

Supervisor: CZÉH, Boldizsár

Co-supervisor: Prof. Dr. MISETA, Attila

Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a once unorthodox concept, has changed into one of the most rapidly growing fields in neuroscience. Numerous factors regulate adult neurogenesis including various neurotransmitters, hormones, stress, physical exercise learning and inflammation. Neurogenesis has been implicated in cognitive function and is stimulated by antidepressant drugs. A lasting reduction in neurogenesis following severe or chronic stress exposure, both in adult or early life, may represent impaired hippocampal plasticity and thus, can contribute to the cognitive symptoms of depression. Our aim is to understand the factors regulating this cellular process and to find novel approaches to stimulate this form of neural plasticity.

Supervisor: CZÉH, Boldizsár

Co-supervisor: Prof. Dr. MISETA, Attila

Stress appears to be increasingly present in our modern, and demanding, industrialized society. Virtually every aspect of our body and brain can be influenced by stress and although its effects are partly mediated by powerful corticosteroid hormones that target the nervous system, relatively little is known about when, and how, the effects of stress shift from being beneficial and protective to becoming deleterious. Decades of stress research have provided valuable insights into whether stress can directly induce dysfunction and/or pathological alterations, which elements of stress exposure are responsible, and which structural substrates are involved. Our aim is to understand the neuropathological and molacular changes in response to stress in different CNS structures.