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JANDÓ, Gábor

JANDÓ, Gábor

M.D. Ph.D.

associate professor

Institute of Physiology

Telefon: +3630-282-9968

Supervisor of the following TDK topics

Supervisor: JANDÓ, Gábor

Co-supervisor: RADÓ, János

Independent component analysis (ICA) seems to be a promising artificial intelligence (AI) method which is suitable to blind separate non-gaussian signals that are independent from each other. The goal of this project is to study the utility of ICA method in the analysis of visual evoked responses in EEG records, whether noises of non-neuronal origin can be reduced efficiently and/or signal to noise ration of the record can be improved significantly. Registration of motivated students are expected who are interested in math and programming.

Supervisor: JANDÓ, Gábor

Co-supervisor: Dr. BUZÁS, Péter

The goal of this project is to develop Cyclopic, anaglyphic random dot stereograms, which are suitable for studying both human and cat binocular visual information processing system without the necessity of calibration or matching the monitor colors to the applied color filters of the goggles. 

Supervisor: BUZÁS, Péter

Co-supervisor: Dr. JANDÓ, Gábor

This project concerns the biological basis of 3D vision. A recent theory claims that binocular information is processed by two functionally distinct, parallel channels in the brain. Colour information has different roles in these channels. Here, we would like to identify and characterise these two mechanisms by measuring responses to tricky movies, so-called dynamic random dot stereograms. We use psychophysical, electrophysiological (EEG, LFP and multichannel single-unit recording) and functional imaging (optical imaging, fMRI) methods.

Supervisor: JANDÓ, Gábor

Co-supervisor: Dr. FÜLÖP, Diána

3D perception is a sensitive and complex mechanism in the cortical processing of visual information. Our aim is to explore the physiological basis of binocular perception using psychophysics, visual evoked potentials (VEP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging methods. The experimental measurements are carried out in the Institute of Physiology and in collaboration with Pécs Diagnostic Center.

Supervisor: CZIGER-NEMES, Vanda

Co-supervisor: Dr. JANDÓ, Gábor

Our brain is able to code, temporarily store (up to 30s) and retrieve the neural representations of the seen images, a process called Visual Short Term Memory (VSTM). Since perceptual representations are difficult to be verbally tagged, the stored information is often vague and vulnerable, subsequent stimulation can easily distort the remembered image. The qualitative and quantitative properties of visual memory mechanisms can be examined using psychophysical, electrophysiological (EEG) and brain imaging (fMRI) methods. The experimental measurements are carried out in the Institute of Physiology and in collaboration with Pécs Diagnostic Center.

Supervisor: JANDÓ, Gábor

Co-supervisor: Dr. MIKÓ-BARÁTH, Eszter

This project concerns the biological basis of 3D vision. A recent theory claims that binocular information is processed by two functionally distinct, parallel channels in the brain. Here, we would like to identify and characterise these two mechanisms by measuring responses to tricky movies, so-called dynamic random dot stereograms. We use psychophysical, electrophysiological (EEG) and functional imaging (fMRI) methods.

Supervisor: JANDÓ, Gábor

Co-supervisor: Dr. CZIGER-NEMES, Vanda

We examine children and young adults with eye diseases that potentially affect stereopsis using psychophysical and electrophysiological (EEG) and brain imaging methods (fMRI). The experimental measurements are carried out in the Institute of Physiology and in collaboration with Pécs Diagnostic Center and the Department of Ophthalmology.

Supervisor: CZIGER-NEMES, Vanda

Co-supervisor: Dr. JANDÓ, Gábor

Visual functions deteriorate with aging, object recognition, reading, sports activities, driving become more difficult, to mention a few, and these substantially affect quality of life. The problems are intensified in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease), where vision domains can be selective affected, and their detection could serve as early biomarkers to promote diagnosis in the early stages of the disease. We use psychophysical, electrophysiological (EEG) and brain imaging (fMRI) methods in our experiments. The measurements are carried out in the Institute of Physiology and in collaboration with Pécs Diagnostic Center and the Department of Neurology.