All colleagues of the unit

GASZNERNÉ, Dr. Kormos Viktória

GASZNERNÉ, Dr. Kormos Viktória

Supervisor of the following TDK topics

Supervisor: GASZNERNÉ, Dr. Kormos Viktória

Ten percent of the population suffers from this neurological disease. It is three times more common in women than in men. Migraine headaches are typically recurrent, throbbing, unilateral, and seizure-like. Nausea, vomiting, photosensitivity may be the accompanying symptoms. In sensitive individuals, certain substances and situations trigger seizures. As migraine attacks deteriorate the quality life considerably, our main goal here is to gain deeper insight into the underlying brain territories to identify new potential therapeutical targets in the brain. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still not fully understood, but triggering factors include hormonal changes, stress exposure, disturbances of the daily rhythm affecting sleep, and certain weather conditions.

Interestingly, the recruitment of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW) by stress adaptation response, circadian rhythm, and estrus cycle is known. In addition, a number of neurotransmitters are found in EW that are also involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Gene-deficient animals and in vitro techniques are available for our research, which can be used to describe the functional and neuromorphological changes in various migraine models at both mRNA (RNAscope, PCR) and protein (IHC) level.

Supervisor: HELYES, Zsuzsanna

Co-supervisor: Dr. GASZNERNÉ, Dr. Kormos Viktória

Clinical and experimental data indicates that chronic stress increases pain sensitivity, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The pain perception of mice exposed to chronic restraint stress is assessed with functional tests in our experiments. Neuronal activation caused by stress and pain is examined with immunohistochemistry both in the central and peripheral nervous system. The role of peripheral capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurones is explored with desensitized animals. Investigation of the stress-induced hyperalgesia may contribute to the understanding of stress-related pain syndromes (e.g.: fibromyalgia) and to the identification of new drug targets.

Supervisor: GASZNERNÉ, Dr. Kormos Viktória

Insight into the functional changes of tissues and cells may by examined by visualization of mRNA molecules and their protein products. With the help of ultrasensitive in situ hybridization (RNAscope) technique, it is even possible to detect individual molecules at cellular level. The technique may also be combined with immunohistological methods, so the changes can be examined and quantified both at mRNA and protein level by confocal microscopy even within the same tissue samples or cells.

This approach may help to determine the molecular background of functional or behavioral changes observed in in vivo models for various diseases. A wide range of animal models including mutant mouse lines are available in our lab also.