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TAMÁS, Andrea

TAMÁS, Andrea

M.D., Ph.D., Dr. Habil.

associate professor

Department of Anatomy

Telefon: 36421

Supervisor of the following TDK topics

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Dr. SÁNDOR, Balázs

The aim of our study is the examination of the effects of endogenous pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptid (PACAP) on tooth development with comparative structural and immunohistochemical examination of  PACAP-deficient and wild-type mice. The examinations are carried out in 7-day-old and 1-year-old mice. In the second part of the study our aim is to examine the role of PACAP in various pathological conditions of the pulp (pulpitis, gangrene), by measuring PACAP38-like immunoreactivity (PACAP38-LI) in human pulp samples.

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Dr. JÜNGLING, Adél

Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide, highly abundant in the central and peripheral nervous system. Numerous experiments have shown that PACAP has neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in in vitro studies. We have previously demonstrated that exogenous PACAP ameliorates the behavioral impairments and enhances dopaminergic cell survival after unilateral 6-hydoxydomanine(6-OHDA)-induced lesion of substantia nigra, a rat model of Parkinson’s disease. We have also proven earlier that PACAP deficient mice have higher vulnerability in a number of pathological conditions. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of endogenous PACAP in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Prof. Dr. REGLŐDI, Dóra

Few years ago we started our experiments to measure the PACAP level in human biological samples from healthy volunteers with radioimmunoassay examination. The aim of our study is  to examine the relation between PACAP level of different human tissue samples and different disorders (tumors, heart disorders, neurological and metabolic diseases).  We work in collaboration with many Clinics of the University on this project, therefore, the students can participate in basic research and also in clinical practice. 

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Dr. POLGÁR, Beáta

PACAP is present in the human milk and we found that PACAP38-LI is 5-20 times higher in the milk than in the respective plasma samples. The exact function of the peptide is not known at the moment. It may be required for the development of the newborn; important as an immunomodulator during postnatal period; important factor in the growth of the mammary gland itself or play regulatory role at hypothalamo/pituitary levels. To prove the function of PACAP in the milk, we use normal and human breast cancer cell lines to investigate the antiapoptotic effect of PACAP against oxidative stress. Moreover, we examine the effect of PACAP on lactogenic hormone induced terminally differentiated HC11 mouse mammary cells. We also continue our research with the examination of PACAP level in different milk samples.  

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Dr. FÜLÖP, Balázs Dániel

Recently, we examined the role of the endogenous PACAP in the inner ear. We measured the expression of Ca2+-binding proteins in the hair cells of the inner ear in normal conditions and after kanamycin-induced ototoxocity. The elevated Ca2+-binding protein expression in PACAP-deficient mice suggests the important role of endogenous PACAP in the inner ear function. Our newest experiments involve functional tests (BERA) and we would like to complete our research with the examination of the role of the exogenous PACAP in this model. Moreover, we are planning to continue with our morphological research, detecting the expressional changes of the c-fos protein in different parts of the auditory pathway.

Supervisor: TAMÁS, Andrea

Co-supervisor: Dr. FÜLÖP, Balázs Dániel

This is our recently started project regarding the role of PACAP in a hind limb ischaemic model in mice. In this experiment we ligate the femoral artery of wild type and PACAP knockout mice and then we detect the blood flow of the plantar region using a camera which detects the blood perfusion based on Doppler effect. We take samples from the ischaemic muscle tissue and show the capillary density with immunofluorescens staining in the ischaemic muscles to elucidate the differences between the post ischaemic angiogenesis of the wild type and PACAP deficient mice. We also plan to evaluate the protein profile of the iscaemic muscle tissues with different array kits.