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GARAMI, András

GARAMI, András

M.D., Ph.D.

associate professor , head of department

Institute for Translational Medicine

Telefon: 61103, 30101

Head - Department of Thermophysiology; Institutional Student Research manager

Supervisor of the following TDK topics

Supervisor: GARAMI, András

Co-supervisor: Dr. RUMBUS, Zoltán

Systemic inflammation of the body (e.g., sepsis) is the 10th most common cause of death in the world, demanding approx. 1400 lives daily. In Hungary, ~9000 patients are treated in intensive care units because of sepsis with a mortality rate of 30-60%. Systemic inflammation is strongly associated with changes of body temperature, which is also included in its clinical diagnosis. Most patients have fever, but many develop a body temperature lower than normal (hypothermia). For the successful intensive therapy and for the reduction of the mortality rate of systemic inflammation, it is inevitable to carefully explore the involved physiological and pathological mechanisms, which are still subjects of research.

Supervisor: GARAMI, András

Based on previous studies the capsaicin receptor (recently known as TRPV1 channel) plays an important role in the maintenance of normal body temperature and body mass. By utilizing rats with functionally impaired TRPV1 channels (capsaicin desensitized), we can model the effects of the lack of TRPV1 in vivo. We want to investigate how the lack of TRPV1 influences the age-related changes of energy balance with measuring the changes of body temperature, body mass and the changes of the effects of central and peripheral an/orexigenic substances in systemically and intra-abdominally desensitized rats as a function of age.

Supervisor: GARAMI, András

Neuropeptides released from capsaicin-sensitive nerve endings play an important role in inflammatory processes. It is also known that capsaicin desensitization – through not yet clarified mechanisms – influences the development of bacterial lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever. We want to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive nerve ending derived neuropeptides (e.g., substance P, PACAP) and of their receptors in the development of LPS-induced body temperature response, also, to study their effects on the activation of thermoeffectors (heat production, heat conservation) that are recruited in the temperature response.

Supervisor: GARAMI, András

Fever, hypothermia as well as obesity and cachexia are results of the dysregulation of energy balance. In our research, we plan to study, which mechanisms play a role in the development of energy imbalance. We assume that ion channels (formerly known as the capsaicin receptor, recently TRPV1), which can be activated by capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of hot peppers, furthermore, age-related changes in the effects of certain (anabolic and catabolic) molecules on food intake and on metabolism possess an outstanding role in these mechanisms. Based on the above, we plan to clarify the role of TRPV1 and other TRP channels in the regulation of body temperature and of body mass with special focus on the age-related changes in their function.